Weight Loss, More Energetic But Weak Urination After Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery

Question Below Submitted By:  

Steve (a patient from Illinois)

I had my procedure done May 2014, I weighed 230 (only 5′ 3″ tall) and had high blood pressure.
The first 2 weeks prior to surgery I lost 17 pounds.

The first month after the procedure I only drank Premier Protein drinks (30g per 11 oz about 4 per day) and started exercising and lost 20 pounds.

For the last 11 months, I continue to eat small portions and drink 2-2 protein drinks daily and have lost an additional 53 pounds (current weight is 141).

The problem I am having is, slow/weak stream when I urinate.

I have had a Sonograms done since the surgery to see if their was a problem with the Kidneys, Prostate or Bladder and everything is okay. I also had blood work done and everything was okay except for low Vitamin D, which I started taking 5000g of D3 about 4 months ago and have brought that level up from 22 to 38.

I don’t know if any other men have had this problem with urinating after 1 year of surgery, but I have found out if I pick up some of the excess fat around my stomach area when I urinate, I seem to have a more powerful stream.

So I don’t know if the excess fat is laying on my Urethra or if it is laying on something else that is slowing urine stream.

However, enough about this, on the plus side, I am a lot more energetic (as long as I exercise daily) and my eating habits are a lot better than before, but I do on occasionally sneak in a sugar free cookie or 2.

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Expert Responses to the Question Above

Surgeon response to "Weight Loss, More Energetic But Weak Urination After Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery"

by: John Rabkin, MD

Congratulations on your weight loss after your sleeve gastrectomy (VSG)!

The problem that you describe is not common in my experience: more often my male patients will have difficulty with excess skin around the phallus which directly interferes with the urine stream.

Your described difficulty with voiding (weak urine stream) is not likely due to the VSG but conceptually could be related to the resulting (beneficial) weight loss.

Your discovery that holding up your pannus improves micturation may be due to changing anatomic relationships inside your pelvis when the pannus of abdominal skin and subcutaneous tissue is being supported and no longer being pulled down by gravity (as opposed to directly "laying on your urethra" which seems less likely.)

One way to figure this out would be to do a voiding cystourethragram (VCUG) and repeat the study with and without supporting your pannus.

More importantly, better than 'figuring it out' would be to address the problem by having reconstructive surgery to eliminate the abdominal pannus altogether!

Best regards,

John Rabkin,
M.D.Pacific Laparoscopy

(click here for Dr. Rabkin's full bio & contact info)

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the details provided. The above should never replace the advice of your local physicians as they have the ability to evaluate you in person.

Related Pages:
- Complications & Risks of Gastric Sleeve Surgery

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[ Last editorial review/modification of this page : 08/22/2018 ]

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