Lost 275 Lbs in 7 Months After Gastric Bypass But Have No Energy & Feel Sick Daily

Question Below Submitted By:  

Cassondra (a patient from Cullman, Alabama)

I had gastric bypass in September of 2014. I started off at 425 pounds, I am now at 275. I am very proud of the weight I have lost. I take my vitamins everyday and I drink my shakes every day.

I have been checked by my doctor and he says everything is fine, that my body is in shock from having major surgery. I am 47 years old, I don’t want to feel like I’m 21. But I would like to have more energy than I have.

I don’t exercise or walk any more than doing house work because I don’t feel like it.

I guess my question is, why do I feel sick all the time and why don’t I have energy? I want to be able to get outside and do things I have the desire to do.

Please help.

Thank you, Cassondra

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01.

Expert Responses to the Question Above

Surgeon response to "Lost 275 Lbs in 7 Months After Gastric Bypass But Have No Energy & Feel Sick Daily"

by: John Rabkin, M.D., Pacific Laparoscopy

Cassondra,

Congratulations on your 150-pound weight loss in only 7 months! You should indeed be very proud of your accomplishment!

It is very common when losing so much weight so rapidly to feel fatigued.

From your description it appears as if you are doing the 'right' things such as maintaining your hydration (first and foremost!) and supplementing with nutritional shakes.

Most importantly, you are remaining under close, observational care and communicating these concerns to your providing clinician(s).

You may benefit from having a panel of 'bloodwork' performed to see if you are suffering from any trace mineral or vitamin deficiencies.

Some relatively uncommon things such as copper deficiency can cause weakness along with the much more common causes such as anemia from iron deficiency or hypothyroidism.

A thorough medical review would be reasonable at this time.

However, as noted above, this may all simply be from your rapid weight loss and as your weight begins to 'plateau' as you reach your goal weight, the fatigue may simply disappear and then, although not necessarily feeling as if you're 21 again, you'll be able to enjoy the benefits of your impressive weight loss!

John Rabkin,
M.D. Pacific Laparoscopy

(click here for Dr. Rabkin's full bio & contact info)

DISCLAIMER: This educational advice is based on the depth of your question and the details provided. The above should never replace the advice of your local physicians as they have the ability to evaluate you in person.

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- Life After Weight Loss Surgery
- Weight Loss Surgery Support
- Life after bariatric surgery - experiences from other patients
- Exercise after bariatric surgery

02.

Patient Responses to the Question Above

no energy after surgery

by: Anonymous

Cassondra, I had a difficult recovery after a gastric bypass (my staples blew out and I had to have a stent inserted to allow the wound to heal). In the several months following that procedure, I was VERY weak, could not eat, and basically sat in my chair. My hair fell out, and I didn't have energy to even walk around. I think your doctor is right when he/she says your body is in shock. You are still a large person, even though you've lost a lot of weight, so it's still a bit hard to get around. I encourage you to find some way to do a little more exercise as it will help you gain more energy and strength. (I started taking aqua aerobics at my local parks & recreation pool. Low impact and there are many body types there so no need to feel self-conscious. In fact, one instructor had lost 200 lbs doing aqua aerobics, and she was still a large woman.) If your insurance covers it, consider a home nurse or physical therapist. I had this and it really helped me get back on my feet. It took at least 6 months after surgery before I began to feel like I was recovering (walked with a walker for awhile and used a cane later). Stick with it. You will feel better, I am sure, but you are still recovering. You've lost half your body weight, so your body is still adjusting. Because of the amount of weight you have lost and are still losing, you'll have a longer recovery. But don't give up trying to get more movement in your life as it will help your muscles get stronger and your energy to increase. I am now almost a year and a half out from my surgery and feel like my energy has finally returned. That said, I do get knocked back if I have the flu or something like that as I don't have the physical leeway I did previously, probably because I take in so fewer calories compared to the past. Good luck and try not to get discouraged. Just follow your doctor's advise and notice that your progress is gradual, but it IS increasing.

Life after surgery

by: Cassondra

Thanks to everyone that wrote a reply. This September was 3 year i had my surgery. I have lost a total of 234 pounds and I feel great. I exercise do most anything I want. I love my self and my accomplishments.

I am still taking my vitamins. It has been a long road but i wouldn't change anything. This surgery saved my life.

My life after surgery

by: Cassondra L Skinner

Thank you for your comments and advice. It has been almost 4 years since my surgery and I have went from 434 to 237. I am very proud of my self and all of my problems have seemed to work themselves self out.

I have energy now and I do feel like a 20 year old. Don't get me wrong it was a struggle and at times and things were hard to deal with.

But I would not change a thing I am happy with who i am now and I feel great and I have all kind of energy. It really did give me a second chance at life.

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